House


house_well-11(NOTE: This post is an updated copy of my 2014 post post [see also: 2013,  201220112010,  2009,  2008])

(Check our your property value using the official Fairfax county link.)

THE BASIC SUMMARY: Our real estate assessment grew 14.65% — the 4th best year of the 16 years we’ve lived here. Things are back on track.  This is greater than our average-average-gain of 7.3% a year.

Our house went up ~20% — the most since the addition. (2014=10%, which was also the most since the addition).  Not counting our addition completion coinciding with a real estate bubble, this might be the best year of actual return-for-nothing. I think it’s the remodeling of a nearby school.

Our land went up 8%, which is significant.  It’s only gone up 7 of the 16 years we’ve lived here, and about 3 of those were real-estate-bubble related… So this is probably top quartile “real” growth.

Our real estate value increased $4,055/month (2014=$1,365). Our mortgage is currently about $1090, and includes all taxes & insurance. It’s almost like we’re getting paid $2965/month (2014=$275) to live here, but then I remember this house comes with other associated costs: Electricity, internet, home warranty, trash, water/sewer, and maintenance.

In 1999, we bought the house at  $141K.
In 2000, we  were  assessed  at  $142K.
In 2001, this  grew   by 3.5% to $147K.
In 2002, this  grew   by  39% to $205K.
In 2003, this  grew   by   3% to $211K.
In 2004, this  grew   by  24% to $261K.
In 2005, this  grew   by  34% to $349K.
In 2006, this  grew   by  13% to $395K. [addition basically complete]
In 2007, this  grew   by   3% to $406K  (peak)
In 2008, this dropped by   7% to $375K. [addition officially complete]
In 2009, this dropped by   3% to $364K.
In 2010, this dropped by  18% to $298K. (ouch)
In 2011, this  grew   by   3% to $307K. (Finally a gain!) 
In 2012, this  grew   by  ~3% to $316K.
In 2013, this remained        at $316K. (Hmm...)
In 2014, this  grew   by   5% to $332K. (back on track)
In 2015, this  grew   by  15% to $381K. (woo)
.
.
. 

We’re 6% down from our peak value. (But not like previous years: 18%,22%,??%,37%).

We still owe $129.2K on our mortgage [2014/13/12=$131.8K/$133.9K/$136.1K].

The house is worth 2.95X more than we owe on the mortgage (2014/13/12/11: 2.52,2.36,2.32,2.27).

In 2014, we owe about $2600 less than we did the prior year.
[2014/13=$2100/$2000. 2012=we owed $700 MORE than the prior year due to refinance costs to get a $260/mo cheaper mortgage payment].

So we are still ahead (“ahead” means “assessed value minus what is owed on the mortgage”) by $251.7K (2014/13/12/11/10=$200.5K ,$182.0K,$179.8K,$171.7K,$163K).

Our gain in getting ahead was $51.2K  this year ($4266/mo), which was greater than previous years’ gains (2014/13/12/11…=$18.4K,$2.2K,$8.1K,$8.7K).

We’ve lived here 16 years now [despite numbers being 1 to low in all previous version of this annual report], so that’s a running average of getting $15,734 ahead each year. [2014/13/12/11=$14,318/$12,997/14,903/15,609)
Per month, that is $1311 ahead each month, for all months that we’ve lived here. [2014/13/12/11=$1193,$1083,$1249$1300].

Considering that we took $30K out of the house to pay for an addition, that’s a pretty good rate of return.

Our mortgage is now up to $~1056.48 (2014/13/12=$1059/$1025/$1300), so this place seems to literally be paying for itself: It’s value goes up more each month, on average, over the entire time we’ve lived here… Than how much we current pay each month!  Too bad about those “associated costs”, though.

(Of course, the addition wasn’t free, it was about $80K, so we’re really only $171.7K ahead (2014/13/12/11=$120.5K/$102.0K/$99.8K/$91.7K).
…Which is $10,734 ahead per year (2014/13/12/11=$8,604/$7,283/$8,317/$8,336).
…Which is $894.52  ahead per month (2014/13/12/11=$717/$606/$693/$694).

Still not shabby. How much of your rent did you get back this month? (If you got free utilities — that at least counts as something.)

These people who say houses aren’t a good investment don’t know what the fuck they’re talking about! Even if it’s value drops 90%, you’re still getting 10% more of your money back than if you were renting! And we’re sure as hell doing better than dropping 90%… We’re getting double our money back, assuming value holds.

 

And even if we lost 100%… e also have way more living space than people who pay the same amount: 2500 sq ft @ 1025/mo = 42.2592 cents per square foot per month [2014/13=42.35/41]. Renting space in D.C. is often paying 3X as much per square-foot-month as what we are paying. And that’s with no yard or parking.

It’s amazing how much more you can get when you don’t demand every little thing be perfect. Things break every year, our electric bill breaks $200 most months, and $400 in January… Yet our on-book expenses are only $2500/month for 2 people (16 year average).

So when I read all these “You need to make $100,000/yr to survive comfortably in DC” type articles…. I get kind of skeptical. Find a better deal. They’re out there. It’s not easy, but it’s easier than making $100,000/yr just to be comfortable. We could almost live 2 minimum wages, if we lived a very monastic lifestyle with no health care.

And things will get about $600/mo cheaper when we pay off the house. Which will possibly-to-likely be this year.  It can happen now, but we want a bubble of financial security before we go broke again.

Here’s the new graph:

Here’s 2014’s graph:

2014 real estate assessment graph

 

More:

Broken down via land vs. building:

LAND:
2000: $71K
2001: $71K
2002: $90K (+27%)
2003: $100K (+11%)
2004: $150K (+50%)
2005: $184K (+23%)
2006: $166K (-10%) [addition completed]
2007: $166K
2008: $184K (+11%)
2009: $166K (-10%)
2010: $148K (-11%)
2011: $148K
2012: $152K (+2.7%)
2013: $152K
2014: $152K
2015: $164K (+8%)

BUILDING:
2000: $71K
2001: $76K (+7%)
2002: $115K (+51%)
2003: $111K (-3%)
2004: $111K
2005: $165K (+49%) [addition possibly counted here]
2006: $229K (+39%) [addition completed]
2007: $241K (+5%)
2008: $192K (-20%)
2009: $198K (+3%)
2010: $150K (-24%)
2011: $159K (+6%)
2012: $164K (+3%)
2013: $164K
2014: $180K (+10%)
2015: $217K (+20%) [school remodel influence?]

FOOTNOTE: 2006 was about when the construction was mostly finished, but due to problems with it being completely finished, it might not have been legally counted as finished until 2008.

RANDOM NOTE: The Google Chart Playground is very, very useful. Saves a lot of manual page refresheses…

 

THE END

 

NO WAIT.. OLD GRAPHS! Too beautiful to not carry over each year ;)

 

2013’s graph:

2012’s graph:

2011’s graph:

 

 

house_well-11(NOTE: This post is an updated copy of my 2013 post [see also: 201220112010,  2009,  2008])

(Check our your property value using the official Fairfax county link.)

THE BASIC SUMMARY: Our real estate assessment grew 5.1888% — more than it has 8 out of the 14 years we’ve lived here. I guess things are back on track?. A 5.18884351% increase , which is a less than the average of yearly gains (7.3% a year on average, as of 2014), but way more than last year’s 0% increase. This would be a better than average year if the ridiculous bubble in 2004-2005 didn’t artificially inflate the average.

Our house went up 10.00183% — the most since the addition.
Our land stayed at the same value.

Our real estate value increased $1,365 a month. Our mortgage is currently about $1090, and includes all taxes & insurance. It’s almost like we’re getting paid $275 to live here, but then I remember this house comes with other associated costs: Electricity, internet, home warranty, trash, water/sewer, and maintenance.

In 1999, we bought the house at  $141K.
In 2000, we  were  assessed  at  $142K.
In 2001, this  grew   by 3.5% to $147K.
In 2002, this  grew   by  39% to $205K.
In 2003, this  grew   by   3% to $211K.
In 2004, this  grew   by  24% to $261K.
In 2005, this  grew   by  34% to $349K.
In 2006, this  grew   by  13% to $395K. [addition basically complete]
In 2007, this  grew   by   3% to $406K  (peak)
In 2008, this dropped by   7% to $375K. [addition officially complete]
In 2009, this dropped by   3% to $364K.
In 2010, this dropped by  18% to $298K. (ouch)
In 2011, this  grew   by   3% to $307K. (Finally a gain!) 
In 2012, this  grew   by  ~3% to $316K.
In 2013, this remained        at $316K. (Hmm...)
In 2014, this  grew   by   5% to $332K. (back on track)

We’re 18% down from our peak value. (But not 22% like last year, or 37% like 4 years ago).

We still owe $131.8 on our mortgage [2013/12=$133.9K/$136.1K].

The house is worth 2.52X more than we owe on the mortgage (2013/12/11: 2.36,2.32,2.27).

In 2014, we owe about $2100 less than we did the prior year. That is how much principal was paid this year. [2013=$2000. 2012=we owed $700 MORE than the prior year due to refinance costs to get a $260/mo cheaper mortgage payment].

So we are still ahead (“ahead” means “assessed value minus what is owed on the mortgage”) by $200.5K (2013/12/11/10=$182.0,179.8,171.7,163K).

Our gain in getting ahead was $18.4K this year ($1538/mo), which was greater than previous years’ gains (2013/12/11=$2.2,8.1,8.7K).

We’ve lived here 14 years now [actually 15–next year I will use the right number of 16! All my numbers have always been slightly off!], so that’s a running average of getting $14,318 ahead each year. This running average had been declining, but is now gaining: 2013/12/11=$12,997/14,903/15,609.
Per month, that is $1193 ahead each month, for all months that we’ve lived here. [2013/12/11=$1083,$1249$1300]. Considering that we took $30K out of the house to pay for an addition, that’s a pretty good rate of return.

Our mortgage is now up to $1058.76. (2013=1025 after refinance,2012=1300), so this place seems to literally be paying for itself: It’s value goes up more each month, on average, over the entire time we’ve lived here… Than how much we pay each month!  Well… Not counting those “associated costs”, anyway.

(Of course, the addition wasn’t free, it was about $80K, so we’re really only $120.5K ahead (2013/12/11=$102.0/99.8/91.7K), or only $8,604 ahead per year (2013/12/11=$7,283/$8,317/$8,336), or only about $717  (2013/12/11=$606/$693/694) ahead each month. Still not shabby.))

These people who say houses aren’t a good investment don’t know what they’re talking about. Even if it’s value drops 90%, you’re still getting 10% more of your money back than if you were renting! And we’re sure as hell doing better than dropping 90%… We’re getting double our money back, assuming value holds.

We also have way more living space than people who pay the same amount: 2500 sq ft @ 1025/mo = 42.35 cents per square foot per month [2013=41]. Renting space in D.C. is often paying 3X as much per square-foot-month as what we are paying. And that’s with no yard or parking.  It’s amazing how much more you can get when you don’t demand every little thing be perfect.

Here’s the new graph:

2014 real estate assessment graph

2013’s graph:

2012’s graph:

2011’s graph:

More:

Broken down via land vs. building:

LAND:
2000: $71K
2001: $71K
2002: $90K (+27%)
2003: $100K (+11%)
2004: $150K (+50%)
2005: $184K (+23%)
2006: $166K (-10%) [addition completed]
2007: $166K
2008: $184K (+11%)
2009: $166K (-10%)
2010: $148K (-11%)
2011: $148K
2012: $152K (+2.7%)
2013: $152K
2014: $152K

BUILDING:
2000: $71K
2001: $76K (+7%)
2002: $115K (+51%)
2003: $111K (-3%)
2004: $111K
2005: $165K (+49%) [addition possibly counted here]
2006: $229K (+39%) [addition completed]
2007: $241K (+5%)
2008: $192K (-20%)
2009: $198K (+3%)
2010: $150K (-24%)
2011: $159K (+6%)
2012: $164K (+3%)
2013: $164K
2014: $180K (+10%)

FOOTNOTE: 2006 was about when the construction was mostly finished, but due to problems with it being completely finished, it might not have been legally counted as finished until 2008.

RANDOM NOTE: The Google Chart Playground is very, very useful. Saves a lot of manual page refresheses…

Mood: did not want to type this up the day I re-installed windows!
Music: GWAR!!

THE END

Here’s a story. The time I may have almost died. You see, we didn’t know that the boiler had to have its chimney swept from time to time, just like a normal fireplace chimney.

house_gutter-51

must also be cleaned from time to time

One night, I was sleeping downstairs. The year was around 2001 or so.

20051008 - camping rained out again - party at Clint & Carolyn's - 100-0029 - Stacy, Clint passed out

this story happened about in this exact spot here

The music that is normally playing 24/7 in our house stopped.

I awoke to the beep of a carbon monoxide detector going off. It took awhile to wake me up.

I woke up, and the house was full of smoke. Sick, choking fumes. Burning heating oil (which is the same thing as diesel truck fuel).

Freaked out, opened up the door, ran upstairs and turned the thermostat down so the boiler would turn off. Possibly used the emergency cut-off switch (red light switch), but probably not.

20051113-party-downstairs-1513

This is the room I was in (sans addition), and it was about this smokey.

We had to call a chimney sweep and have them service our boiler’s chimney before we could use it again.

And the reason I heard the carbon monoxide alarms? Simple: The smoke had gotten thick enough to obscure the laser on the CD player.

house990204Mvc-634fboiler

angry old boiler from 1930s wants you fucking dead

In fact, the CD player never worked right again. Not Carolyn’s 100 disc changer, not my 200 disc changer. Best Buy fucked me on the warranty too, refusing to replace it on the 4th repair by retroactively declaring the three previous repairs to simply be cleanings. $400 CD player + $30 warranty, and it had only lasted 4 or so years.

199811 - Clint's room - before moving out - hardware stuff - b4c7

This seems to be my only picture of my 100-disc changer, which is the bottom black component on the huge stack of hardware on my TV here. I think the VCRs are the only things still alive in 2010 (when I wrote this post).

This experience saved me some money. I permanently stopped patronizing Best Buy, except for that time I did something that profited me and screwed them. Can’t say what it is. I permanently stopped buying CD players. I decided I’d never purchase a standalone hardware player again. This experience is ultimately what moved me to mp3s.

And mp3s? Way more rewarding than CDs. You actually get statistics, you get instant access to everything, you get amazing playlists. Nine years later, I’ve finally created the proper programs, infrastructure, systems, and best practices to get the most out of my mp3s. It took a decade, but I got used to doing things the mp3 way. I now feel I have more control over what I listen to than ipod users, or even other people who have mp3s. Explaining the whys and hows would be kind of boring.

But anyway, out of the ashes of our boiler’s stinky oil smoke, rose a new way of doing things. We have a heat pump now, too. This story can never repeat itself–for multiple reasons.

20081231 - 2008 music graph - top 15 - OVERVIEW / LESS DETAIL - 2wk - min zoom

only possible with mp3s -- you can't do this with analog music listening habits. No automatic data logging!

(more…)

house_well-11(NOTE: This post is an updated copy of my 2012 post [see also: 20112010,  2009,  2008])

(Check our your property value using the official Fairfax county link.)

THE BASIC SUMMARY: Our real estate assessment stayed the same. No up or down. To. the. dollar. That’s fishy. Seems like perhaps values went down slightly, but Fairfax County wanted to keep the tax revenue going. A 0.00% increase (house went up 0%, land went up 0%), which is obviously less than the average of yearly gains (5.8% a year on average, as of 2 years ago), and slightly less than last year’s 3% increase. Our house value increased $0 a month. That would make this the 4th worst year for our investment return, and the worst return of the last 3 years as well. But we’re still way ahead.

In 1999, we bought the house at  $141K.
In 2000, we  were  assessed  at  $142K.
In 2001, this  grew   by 3.5% to $147K.
In 2002, this  grew   by  39% to $205K.
In 2003, this  grew   by   3% to $211K.
In 2004, this  grew   by  24% to $261K.
In 2005, this  grew   by  34% to $349K.
In 2006, this  grew   by  13% to $395K. [addition basically complete]
In 2007, this  grew   by   3% to $406K  (peak)
In 2008, this dropped by   7% to $375K. [addition officially complete]
In 2009, this dropped by   3% to $364K.
In 2010, this dropped by  18% to $298K. (ouch)
In 2011, this  grew   by   3% to $307K. Finally a gain! 
In 2012, this  grew   by  ~3% to $316K.
In 2013, this   remained      at $316K.

We’re 22% down from our peak value. (But not 37% like 3 years ago)

The house is still worth 2.36X more than we owe on the mortgage (2012=2.32X,2011=2.27X).

We still owe $133.9K on our mortgage [2012=$136.1K].

In 2013, we owe about $2000 less on our mortgage than we did the prior year. [2012=we owed $700 MORE than the prior year due to refinance costs].

So we are still ahead (assessed value minus what is owed on the mortgage) by $182.0K. (2012=$179.8K, 2011=$171.7K, 2010=$163K).

However, our gain in getting ahead was only $2.2K this year, far less than previous years’ gain in being ahead. (2012=$8.1K, 2011=$8.7K).

We’ve lived here 13 years now, so that’s a running average of getting $12,997 ahead each year. This running average has been declining: 2012=$14,903,2011=$15,609.
Per month, that is $1083 ahead each month. [2012=$1249,2011=$1300] ahead each month.

Our mortgage is down to $1025 from  $1300 (refinanced), so this place seems to literally be paying for itself: It’s value goes up more each month, on average, over the entire time we’ve lived here… Than how much we pay each month!

(Of course, the addition wasn’t free, it was about $80K, so we’re really only $102.0K ahead (2012=$99.8K,2011=$91.7K), or only $7,283 ahead per year (2012=$8,317,2011=$8,336), or only about $606 (2012=$693,2011=$694) ahead each month. Still not shabby.))

These people who say houses aren’t a good investment don’t know what they’re talking about. Even if it’s value drops 90%, you’re still getting 10% more of your money back than if you were renting! And we’re sure as hell doing better than dropping 90%… We’re getting double our money back, assuming value holds.

We also have way more living space than people who pay the same amount: 2500 sq ft @ 1025/mo = 41 cents per square foot per month. People in this area (inside the D.C. beltway, or inside D.C. itself) are often paying rates 3-4X as much per square foot month.

Here’s the new graph:

2012’s graph:

2011’s graph:

More:

Broken down via land vs. building:

LAND:
2000: $71K
2001: $71K
2002: $90K (+27%)
2003: $100K (+11%)
2004: $150K (+50%)
2005: $184K (+23%)
2006: $166K (-10%) [addition completed]
2007: $166K
2008: $184K (+11%)
2009: $166K (-10%)
2010: $148K (-11%)
2011: $148K
2012: $152K (+2.7%)
2013: $152K

BUILDING:
2000: $71K
2001: $76K (+7%)
2002: $115K (+51%)
2003: $111K (-3%)
2004: $111K
2005: $165K (+49%) [addition possibly counted here]
2006: $229K (+39%) [addition completed]
2007: $241K (+5%)
2008: $192K (-20%)
2009: $198K (+3%)
2010: $150K (-24%)
2011: $159K (+6%)
2012: $164K (+3%)
2013: $164K

FOOTNOTE: 2006 was about when the construction was mostly finished, but due to problems with it being completely finished, it might not have been legally counted as finished until 2008.

RANDOM NOTE: The Google Chart Playground is very, very useful. Saves a lot of manual page refresheses…

Mood: did not want to type this up the day I re-installed windows!
Music: GWAR!!

THE END

I created a command, “after month”, that would edit a text file; I then created calendar reminders to remind me to edit that every month. The result is that I now can look back in my life and have a textual sense of what each month was like. Pictures are great, but there are lapses in pictures, and I shall be keeping text summaries as well from now on.

In addition, so that the post is not “dry” and pictureless, I will include graphs of my music listening habits for the year as well.

ALSO: Summary of our yard sale stats for the year.

(more…)

So… I let Thompson Creek talk us into replacing our bedroom overhang windows, as well as adding a gutter back to where one fell off our house. What they didn’t tell me at signing was what they told me later: The way your roof edge is set up, your gutter won’t work as well as it could, because of this:

window, living room (rear) - from outside - IMG_3685 (20111014)

That is the chimney to our old oil boiler, which has not been fired up since 2003 or so, and is no longer connected to most of the house. Here is another picture of it:

roof view, back - it's a long way down - old boiler unused chimney - IMG_3082 (20110615)

So anyway, they said we should really remove that and get the roof fixed before putting the gutters on. But of course, Thompson Creek doesn’t do this type of work. I’m a little pissed off that they didn’t tell me this until after I’d agreed to the job, because it was already just over $3,000, and this ended up raising the total price of the job by $575 (~19%).

But this review isn’t about Thompson Creek; it is about the Virginia Roofing Companies that we solicited for this job. And it is most specifically TO WARN THE PUBLIC AGAINST SAM AND SONS SERVICES, LLC, OF VIRGINIA, and their estimates that can only be described as exhorbitantly high. They gave us an estimate for $5600. We ultimately paid $575 for the work (plus $25 to fix a soffit ripped open by varmints). Sams And Sons estimate was ~869% higher than the $575 job ! $5025 more than what we had to pay! ASSHOLES!

Can you imagine the poor people who say yes in this situation? The Sams And Sons estimator actually asked me if I inherited my house. What kind of question is that? After the estimate, I realized: People who inherit (and thus did not work and earn) their houses are less likely to know the value of a dollar (beucase they didn’t actually earn the dollar to buy their house), and are more likely to be taken advantage of. The Thompson Creek sign in my yard probably didn’t help either, as their windows are NOT the least expensive. In fact, they are on the higher end of what you pay for vinyl windows. (And one of the 3 windows being replaced is 88 inches wide.)

So anyway, FUCK SAM AND SONS of Alexandria, Virginia 22312 (703-256-8080). I’ve added a YELP REVIEW to that effect, which was also posted to twitter.

Below the job are the specific notes on all the companies contacted:
(more…)

house_well-11(NOTE: This post is an updated copy of my 2011 post [see also: 2010,  2009,  2008])
(Check our your property value using the official Fairfax county link.)

THE BASIC SUMMARY: Our real estate assessment went up again, from $307.1K to $315.9K. A 2.85% increase (house went up 3%, land went up 2.7%), which is less than the average of 5.8% yearly gains, and slightly less than last year’s 3% increase. Our house value increased $730 a month (and our mortgage is only $1025 now that we refinanced).

In 1999, we bought the house at  $141K.
In 2000, we  were  assessed  at  $142K.
In 2001, this  grew   by 3.5% to $147K.
In 2002, this  grew   by  39% to $205K.
In 2003, this  grew   by   3% to $211K.
In 2004, this  grew   by  24% to $261K.
In 2005, this  grew   by  34% to $349K.
In 2006, this  grew   by  13% to $395K. [addition basically complete]
In 2007, this  grew   by   3% to $406K  (peak)
In 2008, this dropped by   7% to $375K. [addition officially complete]
In 2009, this dropped by   3% to $364K.
In 2010, this dropped by  18% to $298K. (ouch)
In 2011, this  grew   by   3% to $307K. Finally a gain! 
In 2012, this  grew   by  ~3% to $316K.

We’re 22% down from our peak (but not 37% like 2 years ago), and it’s still worth 2.32X (2011=2.27X) more than we owe on the mortgage (which is $136.1K, actually about $700 more than last year due to rolling our refinance costs into the mortgage).

This means we’re still $179.8K ahead (2011=$171.7K, 2010=$163K). We’ve lived here 12 years, so that’s $14,903 (2011=$15,609) ahead each year, $1249 (2011=$1300) ahead each month. Our mortgage is down to $1025 from  $1300 (refinanced), so this place seems to practically be paying for itself.

(Of course, the addition wasn’t free, it was about $80K, so we’re really only $99.8K ahead ($91.7K in 2011), or only $8,317 ($8,336 in 2011) ahead per year, $693 ($694 in 2011) ahead each month. Still not shabby. These people who say houses aren’t a good investment don’t know what they’re talking about. Even if it’s value drops 90%, you’re still getting 10% more of your money back than if you were renting! And we’re sure as hell doing better than dropping 90%!)

Here’s the new graph:

2011’s graph:

Broken down via land vs. building:

LAND:
2000: $71K
2001: $71K
2002: $90K (+27%)
2003: $100K (+11%)
2004: $150K (+50%)
2005: $184K (+23%)
2006: $166K (-10%) [addition completed]
2007: $166K
2008: $184K (+11%)
2009: $166K (-10%)
2010: $148K (-11%)
2011: $148K
2012: $152K (+2.7%)

BUILDING:
2000: $71K
2001: $76K (+7%)
2002: $115K (+51%)
2003: $111K (-3%)
2004: $111K
2005: $165K (+49%) [addition possibly counted here]
2006: $229K (+39%) [addition completed]
2007: $241K (+5%)
2008: $192K (-20%)
2009: $198K (+3%)
2010: $150K (-24%)
2011: $159K (+6%)
2012: $164K (+3%)

FOOTNOTE: 2006 was about when the construction was mostly finished, but due to problems with it being completely finished, it might not have been legally counted as finished until 2008.

RANDOM NOTE: The Google Chart Playground is very, very useful. Saves a lot of manual page refreshses…

Mood: suddenly less dissatisfied with unemployment
Music: NOT Megadeth – Tornado Of Souls

THE END

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