Hardware


This is a sequel to a post I made 7.5 years ago, the last time I built a computer (“Hades”) from scratch. The only parts that failed from my last build are all built by companies that are now out of business (Abit, OCZ), so that’s good. (I don’t count harddrives, those must eventually fail.) My new computer will be named Thailog, and will be composed of:

REVISED CASE ORDER:
NZXT Phantom 820 Series Full Tower Chassis
$199.99 @ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146097
A light on the back! Color-configurable internal lights!

ORIGINAL CASE ORDER (cancelled due to lack of stock): 
Thermaltake Chaser A71 Full Tower Chassis
$129.99 @ http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1019135-REG/thermaltake_vp400m1w2n_chaser_a71_full_tower.html, but their “2-4 week shipping” actually meant “in 27 days we will start shipping” in my case, so I canceled my order and bought it again for $ @ .

POWER SUPPLY:

Enermax ERV1000EWT-G 1000W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92, v2.8 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply New 4th Gen CPU Certified Haswell Ready
$140.98 (after $45 rebate) @ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817194101&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-na-_-na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=

thailog-psu.jpg

MOTHERBOARD:
ASRock X99 WS EATX (Extended-length ATX) LGA2011-3 Motherboard
$280.48 (after $40 rebate) @ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157536

thailog-mobo.jpg

CPU:
Intel Core i7-5820K Haswell-E 6-Core 3.3GHz LGA2011-v3 140W Desktop Processor BX80648I75820K
$381.54 @ http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=I7-5820KBX&c=CJ

thailog-cpu.jpg

CPU COOLER:
Arctic Freezer I30 CPU Cooler for Intel LGA2011/1155/1156/1150
$34.98 @ http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=FAN-I30&c=FR&pid=c7cf495fc557aaf929647e403f25fad93878e4ffcfa04ae6768e1191e26a634b&gclid=CjwKEAiAveWnBRCzjqf4zpuUkGYSJABcoZbHsKP_4jaK9fqAOu6rdnCcQ81sunkPkhdwyYktyfVdORoC3Enw_wcB

thailog-fan.jpg

RAM: 24G:
1) Crucial 16GB Kit Ballistix Sport (4x4GB) 288-Pin DDR4 2400mHz (PC4-19200) CL16 (16-16-16) 1.2V non-ECC unbuffered Memory Kit (Model BLS4K4G4D240FSA)
$174.17 @ http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9162554&CatId=11628
2) Crucial 8GB Kit Ballistix Sport (2x4GB)
$71.99 @ http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MTSWEQE/ref=pe_385040_128020140_TE_3p_dp_1
ORIGINAL RAM (PURCHASE #1) THAT WOULDN’T WORK:

G.Skill Ripjaws 4 series 16GB (2x8GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM 2400mHz (PC4-19200) Memory Kit (Model F4-2400C15D-16GRR) DID NOT WORK AND WAS RETURNED
NO: $200.98 @ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231826

SECONDARY RAM (PURCHASE #3) THAT WOULDN’T WORK ($10.30 to return):
Crucial 16GB Kit Ballistix Sport (2x8GB) 288-Pin DDR4 2400mHz (PC4-19200) CL16 (16-16-16) 1.2V non-ECC unbuffered Memory Kit (Model BLS2K8G4D240FSA)
$149.

TERTIARY RAM (PURCHASE #5) THAT WOULDN’T WORK: Crucial Ballistix Sport (1x4GB). Computer could run 1 of these, 2 of these, 3 of these, 4 of these, and 6 of these, but NOT 5 or 7 of these, goddamnit. And my CPU cooler blocks one of the 8 slots.

VIDEO CARD:
HIS iPower IceQ X² Boost H270QM2G2M Radeon R9 270 2GB 256-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support Video Card
$151.98 @ http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161449&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-na-_-na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=

thailog-gpu.jpg

SSD HARDDRIVE:
Crucial M500 240GB M.2 SATA3 Internal Solid State Drive (MLC) (CT240M500SSD4)
$123.99 @ http://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=240GM5SSD4&c=CJ

thailog-ssd.jpg
SUMMARY:
$1,514.92 ($1559.92 initially with $45 back in rebates).
CPU, CPU cooler & SSD from SuperBiiz.
Case, Power Supply, Motherboard, RAM, & Videocard from NewEgg (2 items only cheaper due to rebates).

TEXT-ONLY, BRIEF DESCRIPTION:

CPU: Intel Core i7-5820K Haswell-E 6-Core 3.3GHz (BX80648I75820K) with Arctic Freezer I30 cooler
MOBO: ASRock X99 WS EATX LGA2011-3 Motherboard ( Intel X99 chipset)
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws 4 (2x8GB) DDR4 2400 (F4-2400C15D-16GRR)
VID:  HIS iPower IceQ X² Boost H270QM2G2M Radeon R9 270 (2GB 256-Bit GDDR5)
SSD: Crucial M500 240GB M.2 SATA3 Internal Solid State Drive CT240M500SSD4)
PSU: Enermax ERV1000EWT-G 1000W

Had a dream that re-visited a real-life problem I’d been trying to crack for a couple decades: Converting my Apple2 software/disks to PC format.

This was always impossible in real-life because PC drives were not capable of reading Apple2-format disks. But around 2004 or so, someone finally figured it out: You need a DOS box with *two* 5.25″ floppy drives (and a harddrive). The software splits the various signals between the two floppy drives, tricking the PC drive into using [incomplete?] signals to actually be able to read an Apple2 disc.

Again, this is all a real-life issue. I’d been grabbing dead computers from parents’ and such, but none tended to have 5.25″ drives anymore–everyone switched to 3.5″ drives in the early 1990s, and it’s 20 frickin’ years later.

So anyway, in the dream, I was trying to crack this problem again. I was home at my parents’ house… It felt like a college summer-vacation or something, and perhaps it was. Perhaps the dream-within-the-dream was in the mid-1990s. I’m unsure of the barrier between the two, other than that I knew it was a dream within a dream. Our Apple2 had a modem, and I decided to call some BBSes like I used to on college summer breaks in real-life.

This is the point that I should have realized this was a dream: Had I had a modem on my Apple2, I would have been able to, in theory, use 2 disk drives, imaging the 1st disk onto the 2nd drive, then uploading the image to a PC of mine, using 2 phone lines (which we had). This is actually something I asked my dad for in real-life many many times, and he always refused, thus me still having dreams about the prospect 20 years later.

So anyway, in dreamland, I get on the Apple2 and call some BBSes and such. At some point, I wake up from the dream-within-a-dream, and am just in the dream, which is in the present (2012), and not in the mid-1990s. In the dream, I have woken up from the dream-within-the-dream, and realize I need to get cracking on making this conversion project finally happen.

So in this outer-layer dream, I realize that I need to research the software required to do that. On the software’s web-page, there are a few sample diskette images… Including one uploaded by my friend Angel, which had something to do with bypassing an interrupt on the Apple2. Despite the fact that I am using http:// to contact a webpage (still on an Apple, for some reason), a sysop breaks into sysop chat with me, just like in the BBS days. We talk about the problem, and I probably talk about the fact that I can only find one 5.25″ floppy drive, and haven’t been able to find another.

I wake up — this time, in real life. (The rest of this post is all in real life.)

I am quite agitated that this problem still has not been solved. I realize I can’t get back to sleep while thinking about this, and leave Carolyn in bed to go tinker with our old 486 DOS box that I have. It has a 5.25″ floppy drive and a 3.5″ floppy drive and a 1G harddrive. It has 8M (megs, not gigs) of RAM: 1/1000th of the ram of computers these days typically have. It has a turbo button. The harddrive has jumpers in THREE different places. I try to boot up, but it fails. We still have one “real” computer with a floppy drive: Carolyn’s 2004ish computer, which is still her primary computer. I download a bootable floppy image from http://bootdisk.com, and “burn” it to the disk. The 3.5″ drive still doesn’t boot. I go to our spare-hardware bookshelf, looking through my stack of 8 or so discarded 3.5″ floppy drives. Since computer fashion was white in the 1990s, and black in the late 2000s, I pick the only black drive, assuming that it’s newer. This one correctly boots up the floppy.

I still can’t access the harddrive. I take it out, and painstakingly write down the number of heads, cylinders, sector size, jumper configurations: Taking up a whole sheet of paper. I mess with a few configurations and can’t get the drive to be recognized. Finally, *while the computer is on*, I plug in the power to the harddrive, because I’ve passed the point of caring anymore. A big blue spark makes me jump, and shuts the power of the computer off: I overloaded the power supply, shutting everything down. This can be doom for a computer, but instead, I try booting up again, and for the first time, it works! IT’S ALIVE!

And it’s even been Clintified: It has a bootup 1-key menu to run cool programs like AcidWarp, Plaswave, and LSDino. I will use this to run a screen during parties!

So now all I need is a 2nd 5.25″ floppy drive. So I was going to a party the day I woke up with this dream… And decided to write on the wall of the party event, “If anyone has a 5.25″ floppy drive that they could give me… It would really make my day.”

And then…. a cool dude named Tom actually brought a drive, and gave it to Paul, who gave it to me!

So I got to go home with the drive I needed THAT DAY… Because of a fucking dream!

This is like the most productive dream I’ve ever had in my life!

''Dreams... They're the hurricanes that wash the soulfilth from the superdome of our nightminds.'' --Xavier:Renegade Angel

“Dreams… They’re the hurricanes that wash the soulfilth from the superdome of our nightminds.”
Xavier:Renegade Angel (more…)

When I complain about my iPhone 2G suckiness — and people tell me the new iPhone 3G/4G/whatever fixed whatever particular problem it is at the time (and there are many)…

It just kind of reminds me of when you point out some bullshit in the old testament to a christian, and they say, “Oh, the new testament fixes that!”

That is to say: It doesn’t pass muster with me.

“The 1978 Pinto doesn’t blow up like the 1977 one does!” doesn’t make me think Pinto is an innovative company, it makes me think they’re a company who put a faulty product out. (more…)

Moving files-that-I-wouldn’t-mind-losing to new drive as we speak. New total stats (less 80G from 1999 computer in bedroom that is only turned on a couple days a year):

    Total Usable Space:  12,177,246,543,872  11340.9G   11.08T
    Total  Used  Space:   9,678,221,062,144   9013.5G    8.80T
    Total  Free  Space:   2,499,025,481,728   2327.4G    2.27T
Percentage Free (Full):                        20.52%  (79.48% full)

^ Generated using the “free” command (“free c: d: e: f: g: h: etc”), piped through “frpost.pl”, a perl script that I use to postprocess the free command, giving gigabyte/terabyte conversions, and a multi-drive total at the bottom. Go past the jump for the code to that perl script, it’s quite useful for prettying up the output of the “free” command. (more…)

Moving files-that-I-wouldn’t-mind-losing to new drive as we speak. New total stats (less 80G from 1999 computer in bedroom that is usually turned off):

    Total Usable Space: 10,655,142,125,568   9923.4G    9.69T
    Total  Used  Space:   7,471,858,606,080  6958.7G    6.80T
    Total  Free  Space:   3,183,283,519,488  2964.7G    2.90T
Percentage Free (Full):                        29.88%  (70.12% full)

^ Generated using the “Free” command (“free c: d: e: f: g: h: etc”, I have a “fr.bat’ that is basically free followed by every valid drive letter), and then passed through to “frpost.pl”, a perl script that I use to postprocess the free command, giving gigabyte/terabyte conversions, and a multi-drive total at the bottom. Go past the jump for the code to that perl script, it’s quite useful for prettying up windows output to get a nice total like this.

(more…)

What is your favorite key on the keyboard? Much could be said on the topic.

TEMPTING ANSWER: THE SPACE BAR?

At first, one is tempted to say the SPACE BAR. After all, it’s the largest key, and the only one we typically hit with our thumb. It’s very unique, frequently used, and is the AMUSEMENT PARK of the keyboard world. A huge key that can be pressed down on the left side OR the right side. It can slant. It has a nice shape – a sexy curve on ergonomic keyboards. It’s size would allow it to beat any other key in a fight. It’s arguably used more frequently than almost any other key on the keyboard.

20020727 - Hot Carolyn 105-0530_IMG

note the sexy curves of an ergonomic space bar

BUT WAIT! The space bar is a whiny little bitch! It’s the only key on the keyboard that doesn’t just POP back into the keyboard when you take it out. If you take the space bar out, it can take MANY tries to get it properly seated again. They always have those 2 stupid metal ‘levers’ that must be simultaneously perfectly inserted for your key to function. Otherwise you get one of those DOWN SYNDROME like situations where one lever is seated, the other isn’t, and your space bar is sloped like a slide. (Again, it is the AMUSEMENT PARK of keys, so a slide would be applicable. But if the slide is going down from left to right, then you’re not going to be able to successfully hit the key with your right thumb – it’s only going to work on the left half of the key.))

So in the end, the SPACE BAR is a WHINY LITTLE BITCH-ASS PIECE OF SHIT. It is the key most likely to cause you to have to go out and buy a new keyboard. Hundreds of tons of old keyboards go to landfills, and seep toxic chemicals into our water supply. ALL BECAUSE THE SPACEBAR IS A WHINY LITTLE HIGH-MAINTENANCE BITCH. In the end, while it may be fun to bash that key over and over again — there are even games that only require the space bar — one must conclude that, in practical terms, the SPACE BAR is quite likely the WORST key on the keyboard

THE RIGHT ENTER?

One of my personal favorites is the right Enter key — the huge vertical one on the edge of the number pad. There are many non-typing situations where you need to hit enter to continue. After 30 years of computing, I recently discovered yet another use for ENTER that I didn’t know about: Advancing to the right in menus. My right arrow key recently broke, so I’ve been forced to find alternative ways to navigate around. Most people just use a mouse, but in the end, a mouse is more work and is slower. You lose time reaching. You have to make a bunch of precise movements; it’s easy to mis-mouse. It’s impossible to mis-keyboard. When you want to go to the right, you hit a key and it goes to the right. No skill required.

20070910 - Beavis, day 2 - IMG_3581 - Beavis, in the cubby hole

Right Enter: Even more slappable than kittens!

SO ANYWAY, the right enter key is actually better than the normal enter key, because it’s on the VERY CORNER of the keyboard. You can slap dat azz — your keyboard’s ass — with your eyes closed, and still hit the corner enter. WITH YOUR PALM. The corner-enter and the escape key are the only keys you can really operate via a bitch-slap. And believe me — computers need to be bitch slapped. Hell, they want it. Bitches.

THE ESCAPE KEY?

I’m tempted to make the right-Enter my favorite key, but, honestly, the ESCAPE key comes in handy even more often than the enter key. Countless situations are easily exited from via the ESCape key. Hell, escaping as an abstract concept is way cooler than entering. Escape implies chase. A break to freedom. Getting out of the prison. Getting out of the window you are in. If you want to extend the window metaphor a bit further: ESCape is like smashing a glass window so you can get out of it. And, in the immortal words of Homer Simpson, “Smashing stuff is fun.” Or in the immortal words of Beavis, “Heh heh M heh heh. Let’s go break something.”

20100115 - Carolyn's computer problems - GEDC1333 - 'ESC'aping cat figurine

30 cat statues agree: I want to escape over and over and over again!

And ESCape is the only other key besides the right-enter that you can typically bitch slap with your palm. It’s a bit harder because it’s on the top, so I end up hitting it with the underside of my index finger. But a big part of my point is: Keys that you don’t have to hit with your actual fingertip are easier than keys you have to hit with your fingertip. And in the immortal words of Dildo Valerie, “Easy is better than hard.”

So there’s a big case to be made that the ESCape key is the best key ever.

THE ARROWS?

Here’s yet another one the non-power-user mouse people might not understand the value of: The arrow keys. More so with the left-right ones than the up-down ones. And more so the left arrow than the right arrow. The ranking is probably: left, right, up, down. I suppose your average lame user will simply use the mouse to go back and correct a typo. Me? I use control-left-arrow to go back one word per keypress. You can reach for your mouse; I’m not moving my arms. My mouse is at least 1 foot away from my keyboard. FUCK moving 1 foot every time I make a typo!

2007ish - painted keyboard at Home Depot (diptych)

One merely need look at a Home Depot paint section keyboard to see how much more often the arrow keys are used compared to other keys.

And no, backspace doesn’t win for typos. Backspace erases your work and causes you to have to re-do it. Arrow keys let you navigate directly to the typo and fix it, without having to retype. This is why backspace is not anywhere near the top of the list.

I recently spilled on my keyboard, and lost my right arrow. So now I have to use the right arrow on the number pad as well (which opens the whole “is numlock on or not?” can of worms — VERY UGLY WORMS). At first I was pretty positive I’d have to buy another keyboard. If I was a heavy gamer, I certainly would. In fact, just a year ago I would have had to buy a new keyboard over this. But I recently changed the way I play first person shooters for the first time in 20 years, now mousing with my right hand instead of my left hand, and a real mouse instead of a trackball. (I’ve reversed my long-held position and changed my conclusion: Trackballs are inferior to mice for games). This means that the keyboard keys I use are on the left side of the keyboard instead of the right. I never knew that changing my Quake3 keys would cause me to not have to buy a keyboard. Hidden payoff that saves me money!

ANYWAY, this spill has taught me a great lesson about the value of the arrow keys. I was floundering and frustrated all the time with a missing right arrow key. Non-power-users might not even notice it being missing, but for me, it was something that created stress every couple minutes of computer use. I have since trained my self to slam my hand way over to the right number-pad arrow key, and to also hit control-right-arrow (using the numpad-arrow) without looking as well. It took a few weeks, but now I feel stronger. Redundancy prevents catastrophes, and having 2 sets of arrowkeys only underscores just how great the arrow keys are.

OTHER TEMPTING CASES: BACKSPACE, CAPS LOCK

BACKSPACE a lot of people would be tempted to choose as their favorite, simply because it’s a big key, and it’s used more often, and it helps fix your mistakes. But I think, in the arrows section above, that I’ve outlined why I personally wouldn’t choose it as my favorite key.

20061225 - Christmas - Sawyers - Clint - reading Slashdot (by Vicky)

Look at this foo’ playin’ around with a mouse! Use THE KEYS, man! THE KEYS!

So what about CAPS LOCK?
A lot of people don’t use caps lock, but I recently trained myself to use it efficiently. Holding down shift with 1 hand and typing an entire word with just one hand represents a slowdown. Using either CAPS LOCK *or* SHIFT exclusively is going to waste time. The best thing to do is use the right tool for the job. If you just want to capitalize one letter, or you are typing a word that is typed exclusively with one hand (like “case”–typed exclusively with left hand, or “mop”–typed exclusively with right hand), then SHIFT is the best key to use. But if you are trying to type a word that requires both sides of the keyboard in ALL CAPS (for example, the phrase “ALL CAPS”), then your best bet is to hit caps lock, type the word as you normally do, and then hit it again. (Hell, if you’re using a mechanical typewriter, this method is less likely to jam your typewriter. But nobody does that these days.) Either way, it’s simply quicker and less work to do this. Holding shift down while you type 5 or 6 letters is NOT one keypress of work; it is the equivalent work of pressing several keys. I’d say about 0.15keystrokes per key typed. It’s simply less work to use the caps lock when applicable.

And in that sense, caps lock allows you to NOT have to hold down the shift key for a long time. It is a big effort-saver, you don’t have to strain your muscles as much, it’s big and unique — and that makes it a cool key.

SO WHICH IS IT?

I don’t know! There’s reasons to like a lot of keys on the keyboard ! I might go with ESCAPE, actually. Yes. It’s escape. Definitely.

 

LEAST FAVORITE KEY? WHAT ARE THE KEYS THAT SUCK?

WINDOWS KEY? It’s tempting to say the WINDOWS key, but frankly this key is a time saver. Windows-M to minimize all windows, Windows-L to lock your workstation (if you do this right, you can press the key while getting up, and use your keyboard as leverage so you don’t have to use your leg muscles as much). Windows-anything is a good hotkey combination that doesn’t interfere with already-taken-up alt- and control- key combinations. For instance, Winamp controls music with ZXCVB while you are in the program. I set up Win-Z, Win-X, Win-C, Win-V, Win-B as my hotkeys for those same operations when Winamp is not at the forefront. (Though, the best key to pause your music is actually the PAUSE key — However, mine stopped working in the same spill that cost me my right arrow key.)
So the WINDOWS key is actually a great key.

2ND WINDOWS KEY? The one with the menu on it? Seems pointless, but it’s a great way to right-click something without reaching for the mouse. So it’s a good key, not a bad key.

BACKSLASH! Not because it sucks in and of itself, but because every fucking keyboard manufacturer seems to want to put this in a different place. STANDARDIZE, PLEASE!

HOME/END/INSERT/DELETE/PGUP/PGDOWN – These are actually some of my favorite keys ever, but the fact that they re-arrange them on so many other keyboards reduces their value. I still can’t get over how people will reach for the mouse and pull the scrollbar down for 10 seconds to get to the end of a document, when they could have just hit Control-End. Morons.

“MOON KEY” – some keyboard shave a key to put you into sleep mode. I’ve actually had to use nail clippers to clip the plastic off of these in some cases. Sleep mode blows, and there should NEVER be a key that stops everything you’re doing to such a level. It’s as if 1000 ESCAPE keys suddenly cried out in the silence. Baby Jesus weeps at the moon key.

20080809 - Oranjello - I'm in UR computr - 164-6449

KITTEH SAYS: Stai awai from moon key!

“PAUSE KEY” – It’s kind of pointless unless you set it up to pause your music, then it kicks major ass.

“SCROLL LOCK” – Another pointless key, but it actually has interesting and useful effects in Microsoft Excel. And if you use Winamp‘s Milkdrop plugin, it keeps you from going to the next visualizer preset. I use scrolllock! And it’s another key I lost in my spill recently :/

F9 – F12 is cool for being on the edge; F11 is cool for toggling fullscreen (and is another key I lost to my water spill, now I have to use Alt-Enter and Alt-V,F to toggle fullscreen in various situations). F1 is help. Other functions often start at F2 and continue. F5 is refresh. But it’s very rare that programs define so many F-keys as to get up to F9. I declare F9 the most useless F-key.

~` – The tilda/backtick key. Non-unix people probably never use tilda. The backtick is just a gross quote; you should use apostrophe. These unpopular characters end up being a corner key on the main keyboard swath. And you accidentally hit them sometimes when you hit ESCape. A strong argument could be made that this is the most boring and lame key on the keyboard.

OTHER RANDOM MUSINGS

WHICH CONTROL KEY IS BETTER? The left control is way better than the right control. It’s bigger, and I usually hit it with the top of my palm, directly under my pinky finger. Another key you don’t need to hit with your fingertip.

20080203 - preparing for the floor tiling - 151-5161 - Carolyn mousing on the spiral stairs

Keys that are hard to get to SUCK!

SWAPPING CONTROL AND CAPS LOCK: I’ve also used programs to swap left-control and caps lock. It takes some getting used to, but for me, I use control way more than caps lock (even though I use caps lock way more than most people). This is the setup of Sun SparcStation keyboards, and there are Windows programs that allow these to be swapped. It actually allows your hands to move much less. If you don’t use the palm-trick to hit left control (outlined in previous paragraph), it’s actually quite a strain to reach all the way to the bottom left corner to hit control 1000 times a day.

FUNKY ENTER KEYS: The main enter key is often in various shapes and sizes. This makes it an individual in a world of conformist keys, and thus a bit cooler. Though I still prefer the right-enter to the main enter.

Thoughts? Comments? Leave ’em here. I think I’ve fleshed this rant out about as much as possible. (more…)

Really? I’ve never heard of that. A relative just posted this:

Twenty years after I bought my first Mac IIx, f-ing MacPros still don’t have an *eject* button, and still won’t let go of their f-ing discs. In 1990 it was floppies–today DVD. Two cold boots and 10 minutes later, the disc finally ejects. Aaaaarrrggghh.

Apple users care so much about form over function, that they actually found a way to screw themselves over on basic CD/DVD drives. Wow.

They don’t have a hole to put a paper-clip into, to force an eject! How stupid! I asked, and the answer I received was, “[no hole…] nothing but perfect sleek aluminum.”

Furthermore, to add insult to injury — they don’t actually have a traditional eject button either! So PC users get 2 methods of ejection (3 if you count software ejection), while Mac users get 0 methods of ejection (1 if you count software ejection — Mac users can type “drutil eject” at the command-line, but do you think they actually know that?).

I don’t know about you, but I like having redundant systems. 2-3 methods > 0-1 methods!

My DVD burner stopped ejecting all the time about 4 yrs ago. A paper clip has to be inserted to force the eject. Software eject wouldn’t work either. I’ve paid $0 more since it happened. But if I was an Apple user, I’d have had to pay to replace it, because there’d be no way to eject the disk, because Apple users would rather have sleek aluminum than something functional.

Ahh, the cult of apple. Computers as fashion. Form over function. They claim they don’t pay more, but every time I hear of an Apple breaking in any way, Apple users have to buy a completley new computer, or send it in for service. I’ve still never heard of anybody I know persoinally ever fixing their Apple themselves.

Of course, they still claim it’s so much better. It’s like a person taking their car to a shop telling a person who knows how to fix his own car that he’s wrong.

BTW, Google Shopping says the cheapest 6X DVD drive for a MacPro is $26. If you remove “MacPro” from the same search, the cheapest drive is $10. More evidence to counter people who say “Macs don’t cost more.”

Apple was the shit… in the 1980s. (more…)

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